Three simple ways to use your employer brand to attract top talent

Job seekers today want more than a fancy job title and a decent salary. They want a company that shares their values and supports their vision and aspirations – somewhere they fit in. In fact, according to a LinkedIn survey, 65% of job seekers say that not knowing or disagreeing with a company’s mission, values or purpose is a deal-breaker, whilst three-quarters of candidates consider a company’s reputation to be one of the most important factors when making career decisions. In today’s candidate-driven market, you need to stand out.

Your employer brand is key to attracting top talent. Knowing how to effectively showcase your employer brand across your recruitment process will not only help you attract higher quality applicants, it can have a significant impact on your cost per hire and time to fill. Here are our top three, simple ways to use your employer brand to improve your recruitment strategy and attract those top-quality applicants.

Know your employer brand and own your space

If you’re unclear about what your company stands for and what makes it special, then job seekers will be too. Defining your employer brand isn’t as complicated as you might think. Focus on creating an authentic message that reflects why your current employees love their jobs, then refine this message into a set of values and tone of voice for your employer brand.

Once you’re clear on what you want to say, then figure out where you need to say it. Where are your ideal candidates looking? And whilst that probably sounds like common sense, it’s easy to fall into a habit of always distributing your content to the same old places or ignoring channels that don’t have a direct recruitment or job ad platform. Take a minute to think about where your perfect candidates are engaging, and make sure that your brand is there.

Engage your existing employees

Candidates trust a company’s employees three times more than the company itself when it comes to providing credible information about what it’s like to work there. Your employees really are your biggest asset. It’s important to remember that a brand is defined by what its customers think of it. So, just because I think the nthuse brand is cool, fresh and innovative, doesn’t mean you see it this way, and it’s your opinion that matters here. It’s the same with your employer brand. It’s all about what your employees think and, crucially, what they say.

Testimonials are key here. In a short amount of time, you can create a great video testimonial of an employee without a lot of budget. Make sure your employees are free to post on social media about their work (unless you’re from MI5 or something…) and encourage them to tag you in posts about company events, charity days or just cool stuff that happens day to day. A quick share from your company’s social accounts, and all of a sudden you have trustworthy, legitimate and inspiring content from your top advocates, your employees.

Showcase your brand in your job descriptions

Think about the journey your job seekers go on. The first step here is a discovery phase – exploring their options, browsing available opportunities and starting to imagine how their future could look. With so many job boards, aggregators and career sites out there, job hunting can be time consuming and that’s only made worse with unimaginative or vague job descriptions.

Make sure your job description matches your employer brand tone of voice and resist the urge to use the same content or template for every job description. Images often speak louder than words, so show off your brand with vibrant imagery, award logos and highly-engaging video content. Our research has shown that including rich, branded content in a job description can increase your application conversion rate by 50%! And remember to include inspirational quotes or stories from your employees.

By following these three, simple steps, you can take your recruitment strategy up a gear and use your employer brand to attract high-quality candidates for your role.

Author

Jenny Handy